Jill tracksuit bottoms
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		Jill tracksuit bottoms
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		Jill tracksuit bottoms
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Jill tracksuit bottoms

IOTII Collection, 2015

Price: £80.00 + P&P

Size: One size only

Material: Cotton

Colour: Navy, Dark Grey

Photo credits: Atelier E.B

		Mockintosh Chair brooch

Mockintosh Chair brooch

IOTII Collection, 2015

Price: £96.00 + P&P

Size: 5 x 2.5cm

Material: Silver

Photo credits: Rob Smith

		Travel blankets with leather holder
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		Travel blankets with leather holder
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		Travel blankets with leather holder
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Travel blankets with leather holder

Woven travel blankets by Atelier E.B and Marc Camille Chaimowicz with leather holder.

Scotland Can Make It! Glasgow, 2014
‘How D’You Know Me’ (1/3)
‘Fade to Grés’ (2/3)
‘Emma…’ (3/3)

 

Please contact Panel shop for sales enquires.

Price: £545.00 + P&P

Size: 137 x 183cm

Material: Cashmere/lambswool and leather

Photo credits: Rob Smith

		Lapidary Stylist edition

Lapidary Stylist edition

Shantung silk Clovis workcoat from The Inventors of Tradition collection, 2011
Liquid to Kohl screenprint on calico cotton fabric poster, 140 × 44cm

Kölnischer Kunstverein Annual Editions Exhibition, Cologne, 2011
Edition of 10 + 2 AP

Price: £500.00

Material: Silk and calico cotton

Photo credits: Rob Smith

		Ivan tracksuit top
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		Ivan tracksuit top
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		Ivan tracksuit top
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		Ivan tracksuit top
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Ivan tracksuit top

IOTII Collection, 2015

Price: £165.00 + P&P

Size: Medium only

Material: Nylon

Colour: Sky blue

Photo credits: Rob Smith, Katja Mater, Atelier E.B

		Ost End Girls Collection fabric poster

Ost End Girls Collection fabric poster

2013

Price: £30.00 + P&P

Size: 42 x 59cm

Material: Screen print on cotton

Photo credits: Atelier E.B

		Mockintosh Long brooch

Mockintosh Long brooch

IOTII Collection, 2015

Price: £96.00 + P&P

Size: 7 x 0.7cm

Material: Silver

Photo credits: Rob Smith

		Ost End Girls cap
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		Ost End Girls cap
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		Ost End Girls cap
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Ost End Girls cap

Everyone likes that yah posh-girl look of baseball cap with rugby shirt. Or Norma in the film Carrie – the mean girl with the red cap played by P.J Soles. Atelier E.B grew up dancing to The Pet Shop Boys and with the Ost End Girls caps they broadcast this fact unabashed.

Ost End Girls Collection, 2013

Price: £50.00 + P&P

Size: One size only

Material: Cotton

Colour: Navy, Dark Grey

Photo credits: Martin Clark, Martin Polak, Rob Smith,

		Paravent VI (Blanc Veiné / Fantasy football pitch)
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		Paravent VI (Blanc Veiné / Fantasy football pitch)
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Paravent VI (Blanc Veiné / Fantasy football pitch)

Atelier E.B’s first paravent was made for The Inventors of Tradition project in 2011, which required a folding screen to break up the exhibition space. With it they discovered an idiom that could serve several purposes, acting a site for collaboration and experimenting with materials, as well as providing a bridge between art and design, painting and sculpture.

The works are functional room dividers and essential changing-room furniture in Atelier E.B’s shop installations. Nonetheless, they are priced as contemporary art, and it is their fine art status that subsidises Atelier E.B’s ethical fashion label. The income they generate provides the resources for lengthy periods of research and experimentation, and allows the price of the garments to remain as low as possible for the consumer.

As a general rule, one side of the paravent is suited to a domestic environment, with pattern and tone used in an appropriately modest way; the other side typically employs more monumental motifs or oversized text works that relate to exhibition display and shop décor.

With one side always printed by Lipscombe and the other painted by McKenzie, the paravents symbolically and physically embody their artistic relationship. Never visible simultaneously except in the thin, colourful strips at their hinged edges, the division encapsulates the independence and interconnectedness of their practices within the collaboration, allowing for dissonance and contradiction without compromising reciprocity. In this the paravents have similar advantages to the quodlibets; by placing contrasting or complimentary material together, the intrinsic sovereignty of each piece is kept intact while new meaning is generated by the juxtaposition. They work together yet remain separate.

 

2015

Please contact Cabinet Gallery for sales enquires.

Size: 180 × 360cm

Material: Oil on canvas mounted on wood, silkscreen on cork mounted on wood, steel frame

Photo credits: Mark Blower

		Cleo enamel badge

Cleo enamel badge

Cleo(patra VII) was created in the painting Tombraiders to advertise a fictitious record shop where the merchandise is so obscure that you’d have to be as intrepid as Laura Croft or Indiana Jones to uncover its hidden treasure. Atelier E.B’s visual identity and commercial ethos is inspired in part by the small independent record labels of the late 1970 and 1980s – Industrial, Factory, Sordide Sentimental and Twilight Records. The ambitiousness of their graphic design expressed an intelligence which activated the music it advertised.

Ost End Girls Collection, 2013

Price: £8.00 + P&P

Size: 4cm in height

Material: Enamel

Photo credits: Eileen Quinlan

		The Inventors of Tradition II fabric poster

The Inventors of Tradition II fabric poster

2016

(Surrounding photographs are not included.)

Price: £30.00 + P&P

Size: 40 x 62cm

Material: Screen print on cotton

Photo credits: Atelier E.B

		Scotsmanless scarf
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		Scotsmanless scarf
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		Scotsmanless scarf
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		Scotsmanless scarf
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		Scotsmanless scarf
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Scotsmanless scarf

Founded in 1817, The Scotsman is a Scottish daily newspaper published in Edinburgh. The Scotsman title masthead, with iconic thistle design was an integral feature of the cover. In 2014 The Scotsman downsized to premises outwith the city centre to make way for the new tenants, computer games company, Rockstar North makers of Grand Theft Auto, illustrating the changing nature of the media

On September 18th 2014 Scotland’s citizens were invited to take part in a referendum on Scottish Independence, initiated by the Scottish Government and agreed by the UK Government as part of the Scottish Independence Referendum bill, passed in 2013. In response to the question, “Should Scotland be an independent country?” 55% voted “No” and 45% voted “Yes”. The Scotsman newspaper did not support the “YES” vote.

“The masthead of The Scotsman newspaper, now itself a symbol of a badly declining industry, is translated into a football scarf, crafted in the finest Scottish lambswool; its empty centre a swansong for a symbol of Scottish intellect, politics and pride.” Linsey Young, IOTII publication.

Through textiles Atelier E.B asks the question who and what is Scotland now. Is it time to re-invent our country?

IOTII collection, 2015

Price: £80.00 + P&P

Size: 30 x 150cm

Material: 100% Lambswool

Colour: Grey and black

Photo credits: Begg&Co, Rob Smith

		Cleo cap
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		Cleo cap
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Cleo cap

Everyone likes that yah posh-girl look of baseball cap with rugby shirt. Or Norma in the film Carrie – the mean girl with the red cap played by P.J Soles.

Cleo(patra) was created in the painting Tombraiders to advertise a fictitious record shop where the merchandise is so obscure that you’d have to be as intrepid as Laura Croft or Indiana Jones to uncover its hidden treasure. Atelier E.B’s visual identity and commercial ethos is inspired in part by the small independent record labels of the late 1970 and 1980s – Industrial, Factory, Sordide Sentimental and Twilight Records. The ambitiousness of their graphic design expressed an intelligence which activated the music it advertised.

Ost End Girls Collection, 2013

Price: £50.00 + P&P

Size: One size only

Material: Cotton

Colour: Dark Green, Burgandy

Photo credits: Eileen Quinlan, Atelier E.B

		Brennan blanket
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		Brennan blanket
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		Brennan blanket
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Brennan blanket

Inspired by weaver Archie Brennan’s ‘Meadowbank Stadium’ tapestry the blanket features the tennis player Ivan Lendl who Atelier E.B both had a crush on as teenagers. At the height of his fame Lendl designed great tennis wear with Adidas. He is depicted on the blanket wearing his ‘Rhombus’ design (circa 82) however Atelier E.B’s personal favourite was ‘The Face’ design (circa 88) rumoured to have been inspired by Salvador Dali. Until recently Lendl owned the biggest collection of Alphonse Mucha posters in the world. Lendl is the coach to the Scottish tennis player Andy Murray.

Price: £567.00 + P&P

Size: 137 × 183cm

Material: Lambswool/Cashmere

Photo credits: Katja Mater, Begg&Co, Martin Clark

		Ost End Girls look book
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		Ost End Girls look book
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Ost End Girls look book

Published by Galerie Micheline Szwajcer, 2013
Softcover
128 pages

Price: £20.00 + P&P

Size: 16 × 22cm

Photo credits: Eileen Quinlan

		Atelier E.B poster
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		Atelier E.B poster
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		Atelier E.B poster
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		Atelier E.B poster
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Atelier E.B poster

…In the Cherished Company of Others…, a group exhibition curated by Marc Camille Chaimowicz, Mu-Zee, Oostende, 2008. The three individually designed posters were then produced as a single long poster for an Atelier E.B solo exhibition at The Lighthouse, Glasgow, 2008.

Atelier E.B is a collaboration between the designer Beca Lipscombe and artist Lucy McKenzie. The poster includes Bernie Reid who was one of the founding members and continues to be a close collaborator with Atelier E.B. The design highlights Lucy’s hand painting, Beca’s hand printing and Bernie’s hand stenciling – a pulling together of skills.

2008

Price: £30.00 + P&P

Size: 35 × 147cm

Material: Paper

Photo credits: Atelier E.B

		Paravent VII (Terrazzo gold leaf IOTII / Jumbo labels)
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		Paravent VII (Terrazzo gold leaf IOTII / Jumbo labels)
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Paravent VII (Terrazzo gold leaf IOTII / Jumbo labels)

Atelier E.B’s first paravent was made for The Inventors of Tradition project in 2011, which required a folding screen to break up the exhibition space. With it they discovered an idiom that could serve several purposes, acting a site for collaboration and experimenting with materials, as well as providing a bridge between art and design, painting and sculpture.

The works are functional room dividers and essential changing-room furniture in Atelier E.B’s shop installations. Nonetheless, they are priced as contemporary art, and it is their fine art status that subsidises Atelier E.B’s ethical fashion label. The income they generate provides the resources for lengthy periods of research and experimentation, and allows the price of the garments to remain as low as possible for the consumer.
As a general rule, one side of the paravent is suited to a domestic environment, with pattern and tone used in an appropriately modest way; the other side typically employs more monumental motifs or oversized text works that relate to exhibition display and shop décor.

With one side always printed by Lipscombe and the other painted by McKenzie, the paravents symbolically and physically embody their artistic relationship. Never visible simultaneously except in the thin, colourful strips at their hinged edges, the division encapsulates the independence and interconnectedness of their practices within the collaboration, allowing for dissonance and contradiction without compromising reciprocity. In this the paravents have similar advantages to the quodlibets; by placing contrasting or complimentary material together, the intrinsic sovereignty of each piece is kept intact while new meaning is generated by the juxtaposition. They work together yet remain separate.

2015

Please contact Cabinet Gallery for sales enquires.

Size: 180 × 360cm

Material: Oil on canvas mounted on wood, silkscreen on cork mounted on wood, steel frame

Photo credits: Galerie Micheline Szwajcer

		Lucy plimsoles

Lucy plimsoles

IOTII Collection, 2015

Price: £40.00 + P&P

Size: 36/3.5, 37/4, 38/5, 39/6, 41/8

Material: Cotton and rubber

Colour: white

Photo credits: Rob Smith

		Paravent VIII (Uchiwa-e / Show fantasy escalette)
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		Paravent VIII (Uchiwa-e / Show fantasy escalette)
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Paravent VIII (Uchiwa-e / Show fantasy escalette)

Atelier E.B’s first paravent was made for The Inventors of Tradition project in 2011, which required a folding screen to break up the exhibition space. With it they discovered an idiom that could serve several purposes, acting a site for collaboration and experimenting with materials, as well as providing a bridge between art and design, painting and sculpture.

The works are functional room dividers and essential changing-room furniture in Atelier E.B’s shop installations. Nonetheless, they are priced as contemporary art, and it is their fine art status that subsidises Atelier E.B’s ethical fashion label. The income they generate provides the resources for lengthy periods of research and experimentation, and allows the price of the garments to remain as low as possible for the consumer.
As a general rule, one side of the paravent is suited to a domestic environment, with pattern and tone used in an appropriately modest way; the other side typically employs more monumental motifs or oversized text works that relate to exhibition display and shop décor.

With one side always printed by Lipscombe and the other painted by McKenzie, the paravents symbolically and physically embody their artistic relationship. Never visible simultaneously except in the thin, colourful strips at their hinged edges, the division encapsulates the independence and interconnectedness of their practices within the collaboration, allowing for dissonance and contradiction without compromising reciprocity. In this the paravents have similar advantages to the quodlibets; by placing contrasting or complimentary material together, the intrinsic sovereignty of each piece is kept intact while new meaning is generated by the juxtaposition. They work together yet remain separate.

2015

Please contact Galerie Buchholz for sales enquires.

Size: 180 × 360cm

Material: Oil on canvas mounted on wood, silkscreen on cotton calico on wood, steel frame

Photo credits: Galerie Micheline Szwajcer

		Paisley scarf
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		Paisley scarf
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		Paisley scarf
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		Paisley scarf
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		Paisley scarf
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Paisley scarf

The Kashmir shawl was first brought to Europe by the British East India Company. A luxurious and expensive woven product, imitations were developed and became a popular fashion accessory during the nineteenth century. The majority of these shawls were produced in the Scottish town of Paisley, once the industrial epicentre for Scottish textile manufacturing. The Paisley shawl design is now synonymous with the town and its civic archives boast an unrivalled collection.

When shawls fell out of fashion in the late 1800s, the finest Kashmir examples were kept as family heirlooms. Many good-quality woven imitation shawls were cut-up and made into garments such as jackets and housecoats. This recycling of a once highly sought-after accessory enabled the expensive fabric to be valued a little longer.

With the Paisley scarf Atelier E.B pay homage to a town and the pattern that put Paisley on the map. The text ‘Atelier’ disrupts the paisley pattern flow mindful of the devastation Paisley suffered when the textile fell from fashion and the mills closed down.

IOTII collection, 2015

Price: £190.00 + P&P

Size: 60 × 140cm

Material: 100% Cashmere

Photo credits: Rob Smith, Eileen Quinlan, Begg&Co

		Zipper brooch
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		Zipper brooch
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Zipper brooch

IOTII collection, 2015

Price: £90.00 + P&P

Size: 4 x 0.8cm

Material: Gold plated

Photo credits: Rob Smith, Katja Mater

		The Inventors of Tradition II book
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		The Inventors of Tradition II book
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		The Inventors of Tradition II book
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		The Inventors of Tradition II book
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		The Inventors of Tradition II book
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		The Inventors of Tradition II book
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The Inventors of Tradition II book

Atelier E.B and Panel’s first book The Inventors of Tradition (2011) mapped out connections across design, industry, fashion and fine art, uncovering linked aspects of Scotland’s unique heritage in textile making. With The Inventors of Tradition II, they expand their exploration to encompass Scotland’s recent cultural past, making new connection that brings together art, architecture, design and sub-cultural identities, to examine how style can function as part of a broader discourse.
Through this publication, Atelier E.B and Panel further explore the ideas presented within the collection, exhibition and events programme of the same name, which took place across Glasgow in 2015.

Edited by Catriona Duffy & Lucy McEachan (Panel). Texts by Michael Bracewell, Rebecca Gordon-Nesbitt, Fiona Jardine, Juliet Kinchin, Mason Leaver-Yap, Mairi MacKenzie, Ray McKenzie, Bernie Reid, Rebecca Wober and Linsey Young and interviews with Jill Bryson, Eric Michael and Ellen van Schuylenburch.

Published by Koenig Books, 2016
Softcover with PVC dust jacket and paper
240 pages
ISBN: 978-3-96098-002-5

Price: £38.00 + P&P

Size: 24 × 32cm

Photo credits: Eileen Quinlan, Markus Proschek

		Trio sweatshirt
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		Trio sweatshirt
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		Trio sweatshirt
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Trio sweatshirt

IOTII Collection, 2015

Price: £85.00 + P&P

Size: S, M, L

Material: Cotton

Colour: Navy, Burgandy

Photo credits: Atelier E.B

		Paravent V (Bamboo Florets Burgandy / Paonazzo)
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		Paravent V (Bamboo Florets Burgandy / Paonazzo)
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		Paravent V (Bamboo Florets Burgandy / Paonazzo)
3 / 3

Paravent V (Bamboo Florets Burgandy / Paonazzo)

Atelier E.B’s first paravent was made for The Inventors of Tradition project in 2011, which required a folding screen to break up the exhibition space. With it they discovered an idiom that could serve several purposes, acting a site for collaboration and experimenting with materials, as well as providing a bridge between art and design, painting and sculpture.
The works are functional room dividers and essential changing-room furniture in Atelier E.B’s shop installations. Nonetheless, they are priced as contemporary art, and it is their fine art status that subsidises Atelier E.B’s ethical fashion label. The income they generate provides the resources for lengthy periods of research and experimentation, and allows the price of the garments to remain as low as possible for the consumer.
As a general rule, one side of the paravent is suited to a domestic environment, with pattern and tone used in an appropriately modest way; the other side typically employs more monumental motifs or oversized text works that relate to exhibition display and shop décor.

With one side always printed by Lipscombe and the other painted by McKenzie, the paravents symbolically and physically embody their artistic relationship. Never visible simultaneously except in the thin, colourful strips at their hinged edges, the division encapsulates the independence and interconnectedness of their practices within the collaboration, allowing for dissonance and contradiction without compromising reciprocity. In this the paravents have similar advantages to the quodlibets; by placing contrasting or complimentary material together, the intrinsic sovereignty of each piece is kept intact while new meaning is generated by the juxtaposition. They work together yet remain separate.

2015

Please contact Cabinet Gallery for sales enquires.

Size: 180 × 360cm

Material: Oil on canvas mounted on wood, silkscreen on cotton mounted on wood, steel frame

Photo credits: Jens Ziehe